This blog has been designed to provide information about the activities held at the social studies bilingual sections in CPI Tino Grandío (Guntín,Spain). The English language and Social Studies teachers have elaborated most of the resources you can see but our "auxiliares de conversa" also have their own page and posts. Therefore everyone is invited to have a look .

Monday, January 13, 2020

Project about India

TOPICS:
  • economy- Seny 4ºESO
  • Agra - Cecilia 3º ESO
  • Kanpur - Óscar 3º ESO
  • Surat - Syra 3º ESO
  • Jaipur - Nerea 3º ESO
  • Calcutta - José Antonio 3º ESO
  • Delhi - Lucía 4º ESO
  • Mumbai - Lorena 3º1 ESO
  • food - Nerea 4º ESO
  • traditions - María 4º ESO
  • languages - Alba 3º ESO
  • pollution - Álex Ares 3º ESO
  • festivities - Diego 4º ESO
  • religions -Muslim/Buddhism/Hinduism/Jainism - Xoán 3º ESO
  • sports - Jorge 3º ESO
  • nature - Claudia 3º ESO
  • climate
  • clothes - Paula 4º ESO
  • literature
  • celebrities and famous Indians
  • history -David 3º ESO
  • geography - José Luis - 3º ESO
  • art - Patricia 3º ESO
  • general data - Schadrac 3º ESO
  • monuments -  Daniel 3º ESO
  • map - Érika - 3ºESO
  • transport- Álex Baladso 3º ESO
Use:

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Present perfect simple

PRESENT PERFECT: FORM AND USE:



  1. Present Perfect is used for actions in the past which have a connection to the present. The time when these actions happened is not relevant so there is often no time complement.

  2. Present Perfect is used for recently completed actions. Actions that take place in a recent past. 
  3. Present Perfect is also used for actions beginning in the past that continue up to the present.

EXERCISES
PAST SIMPLE: FORM AND USE:
  • Positive sentence → Subject + verb+ ed or irregular form (played with her.- She came with us.)
  • Questions  Auxiliary verb + subject +verb (Did they read the story?)
  • Negative sentence → Subject + auxiliary verb + verb ( didn’t like it.) 



USE:
  • For completed action in the past (We saw your sister yesterday.)
  • For a series of completed actions (I woke up, had a shower, had breakfast and went to school.)
  • For longer actions that start and stop in the past; time expressions usually go with it (My sister lived in London for years.)
  • For talking about habits which stopped in the past (She studied Japanese when she was in high school.)
  • For past facts or generalizations (Old people never played football.)
CONTRAST:


PAST SIMPLE & PRESENT PERFECT - CONTRAST



Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Conditional sentences




ZERO TYPE CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

MEANING& USE
The zero conditional is used to make statements about the real world, and often refers to general truths, such as scientific facts. In these sentences, the time is the present or always and the situation is real and possible.
  • If you heat water, it boils.
  • Water boils if you heat it.
  • When you heat ice, it melts.
  • Ice melts when you heat it.
  • If it snows, the grass gets white.
  • The grass gets white if it snows.
  • When it rains, the grass gets wet.
  • The grass gets wet when it rains.

FORM
We can make a zero conditional sentence with two present simple verbs (one in the 'if clause' and one in the 'main clause'):

If/when/unless + present simple, .... present simple.

EXERCISES
1ST TYPE CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

MEANING & USE
The first conditional is also called the "real" conditional because it is used for real, or possible, situations. These situations take place if a certain condition is met.

In the first conditional we can salso use unless, which means "if... not". In other words, "... unless he hurries up" could also be written, "... if he doesn't hurry up."
1st type conditional sentence
  • If it rains, we will stay at home.
  • He will arrive late unless he hurries up.
  • Sophie will buy a new car, if she gets her raise.


FORM
The first conditional is formed by the use of the present simple in the if clause followed by a comma and a future simple verb (will + infinitive) in the result clause. You can also put the result clause first without using a comma between the clauses.
  • If he finishes on time, we will go to the movies.
OR
  • We will go to the movies if he finishes on time.

EXERCISES

2nd TYPE CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

MEANING
2nd type conditional sentence
The second conditional is used to talk about situations or actions in the present or future which are not likely to happen or are imaginary, hypothetical or impossible.






  • If I were a rich woman, I would travel around the world. I think it is very unlikely that I will be rich. However, in this unlikely condition, I will travel around the world.
  • If I weren't / wasn't watching TV now, I would be playing tennis. I am watching TV, but I am imagining an alternative activity I would be doing if I wasn't watching TV
  • If you had a bigger dog, your house would be protected. You don't have a big dog, but I am imagining how protected you would be if you had one.
  • If I were an alien, I would be able to travel around the universe. It is impossible for me to be an alien. However, I am imagining what I would do in this situation.
  • We would go to Paris this summer if we passed all our subjects. That is our plan but, unfortunatelly,  we know we are not going to pass all our subjects.
FORM
If + past simple + conditional (would)
Conditional (would) if + past simple
Verb be is usually were for all subjects; was (1st & 3rd person) is colloquial.

SONGS
If I were a rich man (Fiddler in the Roof-movie)
If I were a boy (Beyonce)

EXERCISES
- Malted ESO-4 unit 7 (Gwineth and the Wizard)



3RD TYPE CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

MEANING
The first conditional and second conditionals tell us about the future. With the third conditional we refer to the past. We speak about a condition in the past that did not happen. That is why there is no possibility for this condition. The third conditional is also like a dream, but with no possibility of the dream coming true.
  • If I had travelled to Italy I would have visited LucaBut I have not travelled to Italy and, therefore, I have not visited Luca.
  • If you had got a good mark, would you have complained to the teacher? but your mark was bad, so we don't know for sure what you would have done.
  • What would you have done if it had snowed last weekend? but it didn't snow.
  • I wouldn't have called if I had known that she wasn't home. but I knew so I called
FORM
If + past perfect  // would have + past participle
Past participle // if + past perfect

EXERCISES


ALL TYPES OF CONDITIONALS


Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Past perfect: form and use

FORM AND USE:


It is used for actions that start in the past and continue up to a given time in the past:
  • I had finished the article when they said it was dinner time.
  • Yesterday evening at nine o'clock I had already finished the videogame.
  • She hadn't arrived when we phoned.
Also in 3rd type conditional sentences:
  • If you had asked me, I wouldn't have let you go.
  • We wouldn't have solved the quiz if they hadn't helped us.

EXERCISES:
PAST PERFECT:
PAST PERFECT OR PAST SIMPLE:

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Today's work

  1. Choose your slides in this presentation about Guntín and our school. We want to show our school and school life to the other members of the project.You have to finish it today.
  2.  And vote for your favourite logo.
  3.  And then, you can upload your Christmas wishes for the partners in our project.